Author: GCSTOP

GCSTOP MAKES PROGRESS REVERSING OVERDOSES

On June 1, 2018, Natalie Wilson of Fox 8 reported on Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem:

“Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem (GSSTOP) is making progress in its mission to decrease overdose deaths.

GCSTOP’s program officially launched in March.

Since then, the group has distributed 66 naloxone rescue kits.

“They’ve all gone into the hands of people that are directly impacted, so people that are likely to overdose or [are] around people that are likely to overdose. From our participants, we’ve heard of 20-plus reversals or rescues done with these kits,” program navigator Chase Holleman said.

GCSTOP also has approximately 40 people participating in syringe exchange.

Holleman says not forcing people into treatment, but meeting them where they are is working.

“For a long time we’ve been trying the ‘just say no’ approach and even throwing people in cages if they don’t do what we ask of them and it hasn’t worked very well,” he said.

The group focuses on building trust with people.”

Watch the video here.

NEWS AND RECORD: GUILFORD COUNTY PROGRAM WORKS TO REDUCE OPIOID-RELATED DEATHS, PROVIDE SUPPORT

On March 8, 2018, Andre L. Taylor wrote about the Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem program in the News & Record: 

“Last year, the county saw more than 100 deaths related to opioids, according to Guilford County EMS. In another 700 instances, opioid overdoses were caught in time to be “reversed,” which is usually done by administering a drug called Narcan. Through February, there have been 173 opioid overdoses in Guilford County, with 12 opioid-related deaths.

“On Thursday, officials gathered in Greensboro to announce a possible local solution to the epidemic.

“Stakeholders involved with the Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem program introduced the initiative on the campus of UNC-Greensboro.

“The program, GCSTOP, focuses on following up with people who have overdosed on opioids and are looking for help. Addicts can call GCSTOP to arrange a meeting with someone who can walk them through the process to get treatment or counseling.

“Stephen Sills, one of the founders of GCSTOP, said the program is necessary in the fight against opioid addiction because it focuses on getting rid of the stigma that comes with being an addict and strengthens relationships with those who can help.

“‘In 2018, we want to reduce opioid-related deaths in Guilford County by 20 percent,’ said Sills, director of the Center for Housing and Community Studies at UNCG. ‘It’s an obtainable goal.'”

Read the full story here.

PROGRAM TAKES NEW APPROACH TO FIGHTING OVERDOSES IN GUILFORD COUNTY

On March 9, 2018, Carly Flynn Morgan covered GC STOP, for WFMY News 2: 

“GCSTOP gives first responders and hospital personnel new tools to help addicts. Those who have overdosed will receive a recovery kit including Narcan and information about a 24-hour hotline which connects the addict to a survivor in recovery. With the addict’s permission, EMS or hospital personnel forwards their contact information to the program and a survivor contacts them rapidly and repeatedly with support and information about treatment.”

Read the full story here.