Dr. Jay Poole received new funding from the Truth Initiative for the project “Addressing Opioid Misuse: Enhancing Health Literacy and Misuse Prevention.”

Click here to read the press release in Campus Weekly!

Dr. Jay Poole (Social Work) received new funding from the Truth Initiative for the project “Addressing Opioid Misuse: Enhancing Health Literacy and Misuse Prevention.” Dr. Kenneth Gruber is co-principal investigator on the project.

This project will enhance health literacy relative to opiate misuse and will engage participants in motivational interviewing in order to increase opportunities to engage in the spectrum of opiate treatment and recovery. GCSTOP staff will be intentionally trained in strategies to increase health literacy and strategies for more intentionally engaging in motivational interviewing.

Be Part of the Solution: Town Hall Event on 7/10 in High Point!

WFMY News 2 and the NC Attorney General’s office are partnering to host a discussion on the opioid epidemic. Join us July 10 at High Point Wesleyan Academy. Click the link below for more information!

https://www.wfmynews2.com/article/news/local/be-part-of-the-solution-wfmy-news-2-opioid-epidemic-town-hall-discussion-wednesday-in-high-point/83-90e72200-b360-467a-879e-959d51a64f17?fbclid=IwAR0fBsT8GYybqaB17jKq_-LL6J2aaxHmogyxij7uRclKdCOvjiuuEl1yAhY

HHS Dean recognizes GCSTOP during his Triad Today interview!

The new Dean of HHS, Carl Mattacola, is featured on the Triad Today show airing Saturday (July 6th) at 7:30 a.m. on ABC 45 (WXLV) and on Sunday (July 7th) at 11:00 a.m. on My 48 (WMYV and Spectrum channel 7). During his time on the show he highlights the good work that GCSTOP is doing!

Tune in to watch the interview, or see a preview here (skip to right around 13 minutes in to begin his discussion of the School of Health and Human Sciences and GCSTOP!) : https://drive.google.com/file/d/1eazZmyoMOvWnAlc4s2naGIpHpqYxFpCR/view?usp=sharing

GCSTOP RECEIVES GRANT FOR SEP

On Oct 29, 2018, of Rhino Times reported on New Grant for GCSTOP Syringe Exchange Program (SEP):

GUILFORD COUNTY HEALTH DIRECTOR MERLE GREEN SAID THAT COUNTY HEALTH OFFICIALS WILL WORK WITH UNCG FACULTY AND STUDENTS IN SOCIAL SCIENCE FIELDS TO HELP ADDRESS OPIOID ADDICTION AMONG INMATES – A POPULATION WHERE SUBSTANCE ABUSE IS A WIDESPREAD PROBLEM.

 

INTERNATIONAL OVERDOSE AWARENESS DAY

On Aug 31, 2018, Tess Bargebuhr of Fox 8 reported on International Overdose Awareness Day:

Chase Holleman with GCSTOP says overdoses in the Triad area are still rising, but deaths from overdose are starting to fall. He said the potency of drugs being sold likely plays a role in the increase.

“It’s really impossible to tell what you’re doing and how much of what you’re doing is safe, so it’s essentially poison,” he said.

Watch the video here.

GCSTOP PUSHES FORWARD

On July 18, 2018, Allison Smith of Fox 8 reported on Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem:

Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem (GCSTOP) continues to push forward in its mission to decrease overdose deaths.

Since launching in March, GCSTOP has helped 197 people in Guilford County.

“Some folks we contact really would like to go to treatment, they’ve just been waiting for an opportunity to. They have no idea how to get to treatment,” said Chase Holleman, GCSTOP navigator.

The High Point Police Department started tracking heroin overdoses and deaths in 2014.

So far in 2018, the High Point Police Department has responded to 96 overdoses and five of those were fatal.

In Greensboro, police have responded to 210 overdoses and 35 resulted in death.

GCSTOP is working nonstop to reduce these numbers by providing life-saving resources to the opioid user population.

Watch the video here.

GCSTOP MAKES PROGRESS REVERSING OVERDOSES

On June 1, 2018, Natalie Wilson of Fox 8 reported on Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem:

“Guilford County Solution to the Opioid Problem (GSSTOP) is making progress in its mission to decrease overdose deaths.

GCSTOP’s program officially launched in March.

Since then, the group has distributed 66 naloxone rescue kits.

“They’ve all gone into the hands of people that are directly impacted, so people that are likely to overdose or [are] around people that are likely to overdose. From our participants, we’ve heard of 20-plus reversals or rescues done with these kits,” program navigator Chase Holleman said.

GCSTOP also has approximately 40 people participating in syringe exchange.

Holleman says not forcing people into treatment, but meeting them where they are is working.

“For a long time we’ve been trying the ‘just say no’ approach and even throwing people in cages if they don’t do what we ask of them and it hasn’t worked very well,” he said.

The group focuses on building trust with people.”

Watch the video here.

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